investigating sustainability

LAMAVE have been monitoring the mobula fishery in Bohol since 2012. Our work has focused on recording daily catch and tracking fishing vessel routes to examine and address possible over fishing and ultimately investigate the sustainability of the local fishery. Our work would not be possible without the support of the local community, who over the years have allowed our researchers to record and examine their catch. One of our principal goals is to work with the community to develop and promote alternative livelihood.

bohol-lamave-fisheries-diana-scalfati-2.jpg

The Bohol fisheries past and present

Historically the Bohol Sea was one of South East Asia's prime hunting grounds for whales, whale sharks and rays. While cetaceans, whale sharks and manta rays were nationally protected in the country in the 90s, devil rays have been continuously targeted by local fisheries, creating a lucrative industry on the island of Bohol. Unfortunately while the century-old mobula fisheries have thrived on the island, the future of these pelagic animals in the Philippines has not been so clear.  

Working alongside the local community LAMAVE has been monitoring the mobula fishery in Bohol since 2012, recording daily catch and tracking fishing vessel routes to examine and address possible over fishing.  A main goal of the project is to work with the community to develop and promote alternative livelihoods. In April 2017, the Bureau of Fisheries of the Philippines banned the catching and selling of mobula rays nationally in response to CITES listing the rays on Appendix II a decision passed in CoP17 in South Africa. Despite the closure of the fishery, our team continues to work with the community and the local government to find alternative livelihoods for those affected by the ban. 

bohol-lamave-fisheries-diana-scalfati-1.jpg